Capture A Moment

I wrote a poem this morning that made me cry (see Saucijsjes) because it reminded me so sharply of my grandmother. I love her dearly and miss her terribly, but she is hardly the sort of person people write poetry about. She was just a home cooking, gardening, canning, church going sort of grandmother who loved her family and her friends. But two prompts from The Poet’s Companion led me to my poem.

The first prompt was a simple one. Write a poem instructing someone how to do something. The second was more complex and challenging until I linked it up with the first. Capture an essential image or story that represents the essential spirit or character of a member of your family. So many of my memories of my grandmother are tied up in the kitchen and food that it seemed natural to write about making a meal that is quintessential to my family.

Saucijsjes

Saucijsjes

The thing to remember about cooking with grandma is that
Nothing is exact
No measuring cups or spoons
Just dollops, scoops, and pinches
Everything is by touch and taste
Until it is right  

First divide the sausage
Six to a pound if you are feeding the family
Twelve for a party
Already I’m cheating because I use premixed sausage from the store
Roll each portion into an oblong
Ignore the fat coating your skin seeping into your pores
As sage tickles your nose
The microwave a betrayal
Of grandma frying on the stovetop
Turning rows of sausages quickly with a wooden spoon
Serving as punctuation to her story
Or meting out punishment
Pat the sausages dry
Then wrap into tidy dough packages
At least my dough is made from scratch
And tuck into a greased pan
Leaving room to expand
Baking leaves just time for a cup at the kitchen table
And a story about grandpa
Polish each brown-tinted package with butter
Serve with applesauce on the side
Watch that first bite
Or you will burn your mouth
Biting into memory  

The thing to remember about cooking with grandma is that
Nothing is exact
No measuring cups or spoons
Just dollops, scoops, and pinches
Everything is by touch and taste
Until it is right  

To Camp

To Camp

Soul sick and weary

The road to Yosemite

Promises cleansing

Never the same journey twice

Bonds renewed, joy recovered

 

This Tanka poem was inspired by our yearly (sometimes twice yearly) trek to deliver our son to church camp in Yosemite, Kentucky. He has fun with new and old friends, but it is also a very spiritual experience for him. It has been a wonder to watch him grow as a result of this experience. And both literally and figuratively, the journey to Yosemite has never been the same for us no matter how many times we travel to Camp Wa’kon-DaHo.

Make A List

It is true. Your grocery list can be a poem. Anything you write can be a poem.

List poems are both the simplest poetry form and the most challenging because writing lists asks the question when does an assembly of words become a poem. I don’t honestly know the answer to that question, but I have never felt that my grocery lists were poetry. And if my to-do lists were a genre it is more likely to be horror. However, today I sat down to write a poem (because LexPoMo) and I ended up writing a list poem (see For Camp). Sometimes this type of poems are called inventory poems.

Some lists are very simple lists (as mine is) but sometimes they offer a bit more. See Shel Silverstein’s Sick for example. I love this idea because it offers so many types of list poems that you could write (just think of all the excuses you dream up to escape loathesome situations). Dorothy Parker also wrote a wonderful Inventory poem which could be adapted to suit your current situation.

This form can also be adapted to study processes or make simple observations such as Christopher Smart’s For I Will Consider My Cat Jeoffry. Surely this is a form we could all attempt!

A list poem organizes an inventory of people, places, things, or ideas in a particular way for a specific effect. It does not need to include rhythm or rhyme, but as you play with your words and ideas either may emerge. I will leave you with one final inspiration about a list poem from Anne Waldman, Things That Go Away & Come Back Again.

Give your own list or inventory poem a try and remember to share it using the #JustWrite hashtag.

 

 

Writing Walkabout

Writing Walkabout

Australian Aborigines embark on a Walkabout that is a spiritual journey and/or rite of passage – a journey of self-discovery and transformation. In the National Writing Project we treat the walkabout in much the same way. Writing walkabouts are a regular part of our events in an effort to free our inner writer. The walkabout makes a wonderful writing prompt because it is so easy to execute and yet can offer tremendous reward. 

Wandering and wondering, the aborigines sing songlines to guide them over the landscape. These songlines connect people to places and history. Your landscape can be rural, suburban, or urban. It can even be nautical if you have access to a watercraft, bridge, or pier (Note: I’m already thinking about a waterproof pouch I can use to transport my notebook when I swim at the lake). You can even mix up your locations during one writing walkabout or between walkabouts. The idea is simply just to shake things up and write in a new location while offering up new inspiration for your muse.

Richard Louth who was the director of the Southeastern Louisiana Writing Project started them within the National Writing Project, but I don’t know if they existed outside NWP before than.  He used Hemingway’s Moveable Feast as an inspiration, the idea that going out into the world to write instead of writing in a study or library was a very Parisian practice, and Hemingway could either write about what was in front of him or travel through his writing back to his childhood in Michigan.  

There are no rules except to write about whatever inspires you in the moment. Sometimes some appeal to your senses will send you on a trip down memory lane and sometimes something you see or hear will cause you to wonder and sometimes you simply create a study of the scene. There is no wrong way as long as you are filling your notebook with words or other methods of recording (such as drawings or maps). I have traced the names on monuments and drawn rough maps and listed sensory details. I have made lists of street signs and book titles and graffiti. Again. There is no wrong way. #JustWrite

The point is to change your space and location (physically, mentally, emotionally) by walking from one location to another over a pre-determined time period. Think, observe, reflect as you walk. Then stop and write.

If you are struggling with your writing or simply need a fresh inspiration then a writing walkabout is a sovereign cure. Sometimes all you need to generate writing is a change in location and sometimes you do not even need to go very far — simply take a few steps out your front door or a short drive from home. The best places to write offer some place to sit and an excuse (such as a cup of coffee) or opportunity (such as a bench) to linger and something interesting to study and write about. These places can be on Main Street or in the woods. These places can be found in second-hand stores or art galleries. I have perched on street curbs and garbage cans and loading docks and fallen trees. I have braced my notebook against walls and fences and boulders. There are no rules about the location of a writing walkabout. Sometimes I have deliberately chosen a place because I have to drive there and sometimes I have simply wandered around a neighborhood until I spotted a likely spot. There are no rules about the time you spend writing as long as you write. When I have been part of a structure writing walkabout with other writers we generally write for 10-15 minutes per location, but when I am on my own I simply move on as the mood strikes me.

So embark on your own writing walkabout and don’t forget to share using the #JustWrite hashtag!

Solve for X

Solve for X

This prompt is inspired by Oliver de la Paz poem “Solve for X” which has inspired a great deal of thought and writing for me of late.

de la Paz notes:

‘Solve for X’ is part of a sequence of poems about my son who’s on the autistic spectrum. I’ve been attempting to understand the way he perceives the world and I’ve been using cause and effect models as poetic templates. Word problems requiring the mathematician to solve for an unknown, thus, have become a metaphor for how we negotiate our relationship as father and son.

I love this line:

A spasm of radio and the accident of understanding
what it means to be X

We all have unknowns in our life that we are struggling to solve, to understand, and that is an incredibly important writing prompt to explore and some very meaningful writing can come in response to our search. Spend some time writing in response to the idea of solving for X where X can represent any part of your life that you want or need to know more about whether it is your past, present, or future andwhether it is a person, place, or thing. Personally I’m working through my hopes and goals for the future while coming to terms with my present. Let us know if you find this prompt inspiring!

Artwork by Flickr

Fresh Earth

Study this picture and then write about whatever comes to mind. When I encountered this newly plowed field this morning I was struck by all the possible responses evoked by the sight. What potential do you see here?

Now look at this close up. Study the tractor’s tire tracks…the overturned earth…the chopped sections of grass. What ideas and emotions does this evoke? Can you find you or your life represented here?

If you #JustWrite don’t forget to share!